By Tony Sokol

Talk about a perfect premise for a psychological thriller. The monster at the middle of The Scarapist is a therapist, an ordinary person with some kind of a psych degree. That should be the very definition of psychological thriller and, while the film doesn’t hit on all cylinders all the time, it does have the power to mess with your head.

The Scarapist is based on an essay by the writer, co-director and star Jeanne Marie Spicuzza, who was a victim of therapy abuse. She flashes a bit of Cinéma vérité early in the film by mixing recordings of what appears to be the real therapist in question and the mind-bending metaphysician of the film.

Entertainment 2morrow

By Tony Sokol

Talk about a perfect premise for a psychological thriller. The monster at the middle of The Scarapist is a therapist, an ordinary person with some kind of a psych degree. That should be the very definition of psychological thriller and, while the film doesn’t hit on all cylinders all the time, it does have the power to mess with your head.

The Scarapist is based on an essay by the writer, co-director and star Jeanne Marie Spicuzza, who was a victim of therapy abuse. She flashes a bit of Cinéma vérité early in the film by mixing recordings of what appears to be the real therapist in question and the mind-bending metaphysician of the film.

As I watched the movie, I was reminded of many of the traps that new filmmakers fall prey to, even as I fell under the spell of the villain at its center…

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