By Tony Sokol. originally ran in Daily Offbeat
Lauren Bacall, who smoldered onto the big screen for the first time at 10, died Tuesday, Aug. 12. She was 89.

The Humphrey Bogart Estate announced Bacall’s death on Twitter, saying “With deep sorrow, yet with great gratitude for her amazing life, we confirm the passing of Lauren Bacall.”

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(Photo : Wikimedia Commons)

Robbert J.F. de Klerk, the managing partner of the Humphrey Bogart Estate, only said Bacall died at home. But CNN reported that Jamie Bogart, Bacall’s grandson, said he got a call early Tuesday from his father. Bogart told CNN “She apparently had a stroke. A pretty massive stroke. That’s what happened. She was, you can say she was a tough personality. She wanted the best and if you weren’t doing the best she let you know about it. She was a great person. Catch her on a bad day it could be interesting. She was a good grandma. She was lucky to have a pretty unique life.”

Lauren Bacall was a star of stage, screen and was an early pioneer of live television. She was proudly left wing and was a vocal critic to almost everyone who screwed up in public office. People remember her as always talking about Humphrey Bogart, that’s why a lot of us tuned in, but she rose to all occasions.

Lauren Bacall and Harry Truman

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(Photo : Wikimedia Commons)

Bacall rose through Hollywood in the 1940s after being groomed personally by Howard and Nancy “Slim” Hawks. She was first teamed on screen with Humphrey Bogart in To Have and Have Not in 1944 creating a lifelong pairing on and off screen Bogart got out of “The Battling Bogarts,” as his marriage to Mayo Methot was called, and married Lauran Bacall in 1945. Onscreen they teamed in the noir classics The Big Sleep (1946) and Dark Passage (1947), and the gangster in sunset film Key Largo in 1948, with Edward G. Robinson. Bogart and Bacall also teamed on live TV in Petrified Forest with Henry Fonda, Jack Klugman, Richard Jaeckel, and Jack Warden. Bogart and Bacall also teamed on the syndicated action-adventure radio series Bold Venture from 1951-1952.

But the best Lauren Bacall pairing with Humphrey Bogart is from a Bugs Bunny Cartoon.

Betty or Baby Bacall taught us how to whistle, “You just put your lips together and blow.”

Lauren Bacall was born Betty Perske in New York City. Bacall was her mother’s name and she took that as her professional name. Bogart and Bacall had two children. Bogart died in 1957 of lung cancer.

Lauren Bacall. Humphrey Bogart

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(Photo : Wikimedia Commons)

 

(Photo : Wikimedia Commons)

Bacall starred with Marilyn Monroe and Betty Grable in How to Marry a Millionaire. She paired with Gregory Peck in Designing Woman. She also made Sex and the Single Girl (1964) with Henry Fonda, Tony Curtis and Natalie Wood, Harper (1966) with Paul Newman, Shelley Winters, Julie Harris, Robert Wagner and Janet Leigh, and Murder on the Orient Express (1974), with Ingrid Bergman, Albert Finney and Sean Connery. She was also featured in the all-star Agatha Christie mystery Murder on the Orient Express.I loved her performance as the femme fatale, possible early lesbian in the jazz movie Young Man with a Horn (1950), with Kirk Douglas, Doris Day, and Hoagy Carmichael.

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Bacall starred on Broadway in such plays as Goodbye, Charlie (1959), Cactus Flower (1965) and winning Tony Awards for Applause (1970) and Woman of the Year (1981).

On TV she she appeared on the CBS drama, Mr. Broadway with her husband Jason Robards, Jr. and Jill St. John, and then as Barbara Lake in “Something to Sing About”, with Martin Balsam as Nate.

Bacall was awarded the Kennedy Center

Lauren Bacall and Humphrey Bogart

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(Photo : Wikimedia Commons)

Honors in 1997 and won a Special Oscar in 2009. Her memoir By Myselfwon the National Book Award. Lauren Bacall lived at the Dakota on 72nd Street a distinctive address on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

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